frank news is dedicated to storytelling across all mediums. A space for debate, discussion, and connection between experts and a curious readership. Topics are presented monthly with content delivered daily.

Founders

Tatti Ribeiro
Clare McLaughlin
Want to share your story?
Become a contributor
Contact Us
October: Process
31st
No articles
30th
No articles
29th
No articles
28th
No articles
27th
No articles
26th
No articles
25th
No articles
24th
No articles
23rd
No articles
22nd

interviews

Democratizing the Debates

by Kathleen Jameison Hall
21st
No articles
20th

interviews

Why We Participate

by Jan Leighley
19th

interviews

Those Enumerated

by David Schulltz

interviews

After the Polls Close

by John Fortier
18th
No articles
16th
No articles
14th

interviews

Losing Our Religion

by Lonna Atkeson
11th
No articles
10th
No articles
9th
No articles
8th
No articles
6th
5th
No articles
4th
No articles
3rd
No articles
2nd
No articles
1st
© Frank

news

The 5 Statuses of American Indians

by General Neesu Wushuwunoag
July 29, 2020
5 statuses of American Indians
- All American Indians are US Citizens per the Snyder Act of 1924 (8 USC 1401(b));
- 8 USC 1401(b) acknowledges dual citizenship status of American Indians (tribal property);
- American Indian status is dependent upon a) the individual American Indian’s relationship with an American Indian Tribe, and b) the American Indian Tribe‘s relationship with the State/US.

1) Misclassified Indians (MI)American Indians who have been able to document that they/their ancestors were reclassified to statuses such as “Negro, Colored, Mulatto, Mestizo, Mustee, White, etc...”, but have not legally/lawfully reclassified from these statuses to “American Indian.” MI may not be aware of what specific tribal nation(s) they descend from, and typically have no formal ties established to any American Indian tribe. MI do not possess dual citizenship status under US Law and are subject to State and Federal jurisdiction.

 
2) Rural/Urban Indians (RUI): American Indians living in urban/rural areas who may have formal ties to an American Indian Tribe but the Tribe does not exist commercially or is established under domestic jurisdiction (e.g nonprofit, LLC, LLP, C Corp, etc...). RUI do not possess dual citizenship status under US Law and are subject to State and Federal jurisdiction.
 
3) State Recognized American Indians (SRAI): American Indians that have formal ties to American Indian Tribes that have established a recognition relationship with a State. SRAI are legally classified as “Native American” and are entitled to certain rights while on reservation lands. Tribe may have treaty rights, but is considered a “County” of the State. SRAI possess dual citizenship status but are subject to State and Federal jurisdiction when off reservation.
 
4) Federally Recognized American Indians (FRAI): American Indians that have formal ties to American Indian Tribes that have established a recognition status with the US through a “deed for trust” relationship. FRAI are legally classified as “Native American” and are entitled to certain rights while on reservation lands. Tribe may have treaty rights, but is considered a “Domestic Dependent Nation” of the US. FRAI possess dual citizenship status but are subject to State and Federal jurisdiction when off reservation.
 
5) “Indian Not Taxed” (INT)American Indians that have formal ties to American Indian Tribes that are party to colonial era treaties, that have not abrogated their treaty rights or sovereign status, and that have established “commercial viability” outside of US jurisdiction. INT are considered “Foreign National Aboriginal Inhabitant” and are subject to tribal law, treaty relationships, and specific agreements established between their Tribe and the State/US. INT possess dual citizenship status but are subject tribal jurisdiction at all times; unless their Tribe has specifically conferred jurisdiction for a particular matter.